Item sinks

Ashes of Creation community empowered Wiki
(Redirected from Armor durability)
Jump to navigation Jump to search

It's important for a healthy economy to have item sinks, so that anything that can be crafted can also be destroyed. There are four kinds of item sinks in Ashes of Creation:[1]

  1. Item durability (item decay).[2][3] Zero percent durability will unequip an item, increasing its repair costs.[4]
  2. Over-enchanting carries the risk of destroying that item.[5]
  3. Players gain craftable items and recipes from deconstructing (salvaging) completed items.[5]
  4. A portion of resources and materials are lost when caravans or nodes are destroyed.[6]

An important aspect of a healthy economy is having some item sinks available... There are three kinds of item sinks: You can gain craftable items from deconstructing completed items; You can have decay... and if you want to over-enchant that item there will be a potential to destroy it as well. It's important for an economy to experience those types of emphasis on what can be crafted as well as seeing those items that are crafted be destroyed as well..[3]

The concept there is this is part of the engine that is supply and demand. So the server is constantly generating these materials on tick as they kind of propagate throughout the world and get repopulated, players are going out there and collecting these things. We want to make sure that there is a driving force and factor behind what crafters and gatherers are out there doing: There's constantly going to be a demand for them to supply these things. Whether that death is from PvP or from PvE these are going to be necessities for players to constantly provide.[2]Steven Sharif

Power creep

Power creep is a balance issue... When it comes to gear progression specifically, the idea is to create an open market that is not heavily dependent on soulbound items; and having many item sinks and gold sinks within that economy that allows for the potential degradation and loss of assets within that closed economy; and not introduce items from the market that companies put in from a pay-to-win perspective or from a pay-to-convenience perspective that undermines the economy that players have built. That is a huge mistake that companies have made in the past and that lends to the imbalancing of what designers maybe have actually balanced well.[7]Steven Sharif

Item durability

There is item durability (item decay) in Ashes of Creation.[3]

The decay system is not going to be some worthless "Oh I'm just going to throw some gold into this and it's a simple gold sink". It's actually going to require some base materials in order to repair decayed items; and decay occurs from death and also the destruction and disable system. For the weapons over the over-enchanting will require those materials as well. So creating that dependency I think is healthy for the crafting economy.[8]Steven Sharif

There is durability in the game... It's not going to be a trivial durability. There is a potential to destroy gear (weapons and armor), but there is also an ability to reforge that destroyed gear using a portion of the materials necessary as well as finding an item creator who can reforge it.[3]Steven Sharif

Item repair

Item repair will cost crafting materials.[2][14][3]

For example: if you have an iron sword and then the sword gets damaged from use, you have to use more iron to repair it; and what that does is... make sure that there's significant sinks in the game for base materials so that you are creating a scarcity and demand that's present on the creation of higher goods as well as supplying the necessary decay components for the world.[14]Steven Sharif

Item deconstruction

Players gain craftable items and recipes from deconstructing (salvaging, dismantling, disenchanting) completed items.[5]

There's salvaging where you can deconstruct an item to get components only capable of retrieving from salvaging an item that can be used in crafting other types of items.[1]Steven Sharif

Enchanting

There are two types of enchantments for items: Vertical and horizontal.[16]

When it comes to over-enchanting things, what we're going to do likely is have a safety- and this is something obviously it needs to be tested- but we're going to have a safety period of enchantment you know like in Lineage 2 I think you could enchant plus four or something. And so we're gonna have a similar system where you can enchant safely and then when you start to take risks, that percentage of potentially damaging your item either through the decay system or completely disabling it through the destruction system will be a risk that's present.[11]Steven Sharif

  • Horizontal enchantments are more situational. For example: I'd like my sword to do force damage instead of holy damage because the monsters I tend to fight are incorporeal.[16]
    • This doesn't make the item more powerful, but instead more applicable to different situations, and less so to others.[16]
    • This type of enchanting assumes no risk, just time and effort.[16]

Enchanting services are sold at player stalls.[18]

Enchanting does not increase an item's level requirement.[19]

You don't really push a particular item's level requirement or the identity of that item. You can enhance it, you can add enchantments to it, but it's still the item it is.[19]Steven Sharif

Caravan destruction

If a caravan is destroyed (becomes a wreckage) it will drop a portion of the goods it was transporting.[20][21][22]

  • Caravan components may also drop when a caravan is destroyed. These components may be salvageable by the caravan owner or by other players, in the case of high grade components.[23]
  • Caravans drop certificates for heavy goods that are redeemable at the origin node for a portion of the goods.[24][22]

The caravan becomes a wreckage upon destruction and that wreckage is an interfaceable item that players can come up to and they can receive certificates for a portion of the goods inside the caravan. Now the idea with that certificate is that it must be taken back to the point of origin, or at least a region within that point of origin. We'll see about that last part because there's a few things I want to test in the Alpha from a gameability standpoint. The reason why for this is because what might happen is you may have some type of collaboration within a guild to kind of game that system. Hey I'm gonna reach this caravan just to the border of the region and then we're all destroy it, collect the goods and take it to you know that region's warehouse; and have to skip out on the last half of the way. So it must successfully reach its destination before the goods can be considered a part of that region.[22]Steven Sharif

See also

References